Announcement

Due to the large volume of manuscripts currently awaiting decisions by the Harvard Educational Review, the Editorial Board has decided to pause the general open calls for Research articles, Essays, Voices articles, and Other Submissions, effective May 19, 2019, at 11:55 pm Eastern time. General open calls will resume in Fall 2019; please check this space for updates on the reopening.

The Special Issue on Youth Voices Open calls will remain open. 

Any open call manuscripts already submitted and acknowledged by HER, plus all invited manuscripts, R&R’d manuscripts, and manuscripts currently in production, are NOT affected in any way by the pause in open calls.

If you have concerns or questions, please visit the FAQ (at HER-documents), or contact the content editors at HER_manuscripts@gse.harvard.edu

Thank you very much for your interest in Harvard Educational Review and for your patience with our process.

The 2018-2019 Editorial Board

___________________________________________________________________

The Harvard Educational Review is a journal of opinion and research in the field of education. Articles are selected, edited, and published by an editorial board of graduate students at Harvard University. The editorial policy does not reflect an official position of the faculty of Education or any other Harvard faculty. (print ISSN 0017-8055, online ISSN 1943-5045) 

HER accepts contributions from researchers, scholars, policy makers, practitioners, teachers, students, and informed observers in education and related fields. In addition to original reports of research and theory, HER welcomes articles that reflect on teaching and practice in educational settings in the United States and abroad. 

It is the policy of HER to review manuscripts that are not simultaneously being considered at another journal. HER will not consider manuscripts that are currently available online. To this end, the journal requires that authors remove manuscripts from publicly available websites before submission.

Please follow these guidelines in preparing any manuscript for submission. 

Calls

Research Articles
Manuscripts reporting original research related to education should include: background and context and/or theoretical/conceptual framework, literature review, methods, findings and analysis, and discussion sections. The literature review should be relevant to the research topic and findings. All methodologies need to be clearly described and should match the research questions or stated purpose of the manuscript. The findings should be clear, and the arguments set forth should emerge from the analysis of the data presented in the manuscript. Accepted manuscripts typically include clear implications of the research and are accessible to HER’s generalist readership.

Essays
An essay should have a well-developed argument that answers a particular question or several related questions. This argument may engage with previous work and may take on a subjective point of view. Essays should include reasoning, evidence, and examples to support the author’s thesis. They may also take other forms, including expository or narrative manuscripts.

Voices: Reflective Accounts of Education
The Harvard Educational Review recognizes the value of experiential knowledge and is committed to featuring the voices of people engaged in various educational activities around the world. We welcome reflective pieces written by students, teachers, parents, community members, and others involved in education whose perspectives can inform policy, practice, and/or research. The power of Voices: Reflective Accounts of Education articles rests primarily in the voice of the author(s) and its rich grounding in practice, which may be informed by theory and research. Submissions generally contain a detailed narrative that weaves together ideas, situations, and experiences and highlights key learnings.

Additional Submissions
HER welcomes submissions in addition to the above categories. If your manuscript does not correspond to any of the above categories, please select this option. On submission, you will be asked to provide a statement of up to 100 words that describes the nature of your manuscript.

If you are not sure which category is most appropriate for your manuscript, please browse the contents of past issues of HER and search published articles here, for a more detailed picture. You are also welcome to contact the content editors for assistance by emailing them at HER_manuscripts@gse.harvard.edu  

Criteria

 Significance and Impact

Manuscripts should focus on questions relevant to the field of education. These questions should be pointed and should also have implications for broader educational problems, nationally and/or globally. Manuscripts should contribute to the work of stakeholders seeking to address educational challenges and should explicitly state their contributions, whether theoretical or practical, in order to identify the populations that would most benefit from its publication, such as teachers, policy makers, or students.

 Advancement of the Field

The manuscript should push existing theory in a new direction and/or extend, fill in a gap, or bring a new perspective to current literature.

 Clarity and Style

Manuscripts must be well written in clear, concise language and be free of technical jargon. As a generalist journal, HER strives for all articles to be widely accessible to nonexperts. Previously published HER articles can serve as examples of the style of writing appropriate for the audience. The editors understand that the specific organization of a manuscript may differ according to discipline and the author’s aesthetic.

Review process

HER has a two-stage review process. In the first stage, all manuscripts are read by a minimum of two Editorial Board members. It usually takes 12 to 16 weeks for a manuscript to complete the first stage of review and for a decision letter to be sent by email. Due to time constraints and the large volume of manuscripts received, HER does not provide comments on unsolicited manuscripts that are rejected at the first stage of review. 

  During the second stage of review, manuscripts are read by the full Editorial Board at the weekly meeting. Any manuscript that is not accepted at this stage of review will receive written feedback based on the Board's discussion. It usually takes 12 weeks for a manuscript to complete the second stage of review. 

Submission Guidelines

  Authors should submit their manuscript within one of the following categories: Research article, Essay, Voices, Additional. Specific guidelines may pertain to each of these manuscript types.

 Formatting

  •  HER accepts manuscripts of up to 9,000 words, which includes abstract, keywords, references, and appendices, footnotes, graphic elements. HER reserves the right to return any manuscript that exceeds that length.
  •  All text must be double spaced, type size must be at least 12 point with 1-inch margins on all sides, and paper size should be set to 8.5 x 11, even if printed on A4 paper.
  • Manuscripts are reviewed anonymously. Any references that identify the author/s in the text must be masked or made anonymous (e.g., instead of citing "Field & Bloom, 2007,” cite “Author/s, 2007”). For the reference list, place the citations alphabetically as "Author/s. (2007). Details omitted for blind review." Articles can also be blinded effectively by use of the third-person. For example, rather than "in an earlier article, we showed that" substitute something like "as has been shown in Field & Bloom, 2007.” In this case, there is no need to mask the reference in the list. Please do not submit a title page as part of your manuscript. We will capture that information in the submission form. Finally, please save the uploaded manuscript as the title of the manuscript and do not include the author/s name/s.
  •  Authors should refer to The Chicago Manual of Style for general questions of style, grammar, punctuation, and form, and for footnotes of theoretical, descriptive, or essay-like material.
  •  The journal defers to author preference in decisions about naming and capitalization of racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. Manuscripts should be internally consistent in this regard.
  •  For all nonlegal manuscripts, authors should use the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association for reference and citation formats. References must be in APA format. The Uniform System of Citation, published by the Harvard Law Review, should be used for articles that rely heavily on legal documentation; because this form is not easily adaptable to other sources, it is usually combined with Chicago as necessary. Manuscripts with references and/or citations in another form will be returned to the author/s).

 

Keywords

Immediately after the abstract, provide a maximum of 6 keywords, based on the ERIC list of index descriptors (see: http://www.eric.ed.gov/ ). Authors may choose to include one or two “free” keywords not included on the ERIC list of descriptors if they wish to do so. The keywords will be used for indexing, and to improve detection in scholarly searches.

  Submission Procedure

  To submit a manuscript for consideration to Harvard Educational Review, please select the submission Call and follow the instructions for your intended manuscript type. 

  Contacting the Harvard Educational Review

By email

For process-related questions in submitting a manuscript, please contact Laura Clos at laura_clos@gse.harvard.edu 

For content-related queries, please email the Content Editors at HER_manuscripts@gse.harvard.edu 

Thank you very much for considering the Harvard Educational Review as a forum for your work.

Editorial Board
Harvard Educational Review
8 Story Street, First Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

Thank you for your interest.

This call is intended only for submission of manuscripts that have gone through the review process and been invited by the editorial board to be revised and resubmitted. Please do not use this category for manuscripts that have not been reviewed by the editorial board. Please include a separate letter to the editors addressing the specific recommendations made in their letter to you. If you have any questions, please contact the solicits and invitations editor at HER_invites@gse.harvard.edu

Thank you.
This call is intended only for submission of manuscripts that have been formally solicited by the editorial board. Please include the solicit proposal approved by the editorial board. If you have any questions about the process or want to request preliminary review of the manuscript, please contact the solicits and invitations editor at HER_invites@gse.harvard.edu

Thank you.
This call is intended only for submission of manuscripts invited by the editorial board. Please be sure to include the original invitation letter for our records. If you have any questions about the due date or preliminary review of the manuscript, please contact our solicits and invitations editor at HER_invites@gse.harvard.edu 

Thank you.

The Harvard Educational Review (HER) is planning an upcoming Special Issue on Youth Voices in Education Research. The aim of this Special Issue is to elevate the voices of young people as key contributors to academic conversations that aim to improve the schools, communities, and complex social contexts in which they live. In our era, some of the loudest calls for justice and most innovative solutions to entrenched educational issues are coming from youth. This presents an opportunity for adults in our field to listen and learn from their experiences of and proposed solutions for educational challenges. With this Special Issue, we aim to showcase work which: 1) gives voice to both the individual and shared experiences of youth; 2) is designed to empower and benefit youth participants; 3) involves youth in selecting the study’s goals and/or giving input on the research methodology; and 4) positions itself as accountable to youth and the communities in which they live.  We hope to spotlight both seasoned youth-driven researchers and practitioners and those who are in emergent stages of developing a youth-centered practice. 

If you are an adult scholar, researcher or practitioner submitting a research article, essay, or voices piece, please consider the following as potential forms and topics your piece could address: 

  • Models of involving youth more actively in research or creating research that has the direct goal of empowering youth. This could take the form of an essay that reflects on or describes the process of shifting one’s research agenda to center youth, a dialogue between researchers and youth participants about the research project and process, a research paper accompanied by reflections from youth participants about their involvement and experiences. 
  • Methodological texts that discuss strategies for empowering youth research participants when researching youth, for example through including youth participants in novel forms of method choice, research design, or reliability checks.
  • Reflections from practitioners about their efforts, challenges, and successes in training youth to engage in critical praxis or more traditional research projects.
  • Critical or action-based research that builds off of goals, problems, or potential solutions identified by youth. 

Please note that submissions that are collaborations between young people and adults are welcome in this category if the primary author is an adult. If authorship is equally shared between youth and adults, or youth are the primary authors, please submit to the youth call.  Additionally, please see Guidelines for Authors for more information about what we look for in research articles, essays, and voices pieces. 

The deadline for all submissions for this Special Issue is August 31st, 2019.


Submission Details

Submit your manuscript at https://hepg.submittable.com/submit in the SPECIAL ISSUE- Youth Voices in Education Research (Adult Submissions)

Formatting

  • HER accepts manuscripts from 3,000 to 9,000 words, which should include: abstract, keywords, body of the text, references, plus appendices and graphic elements, if appropriate. We reserve the option to return any manuscript that does not meet this length.
  • All text must be double spaced, type size must be at least 12 point with 1-inch margins on all sides, and paper size should be set to 8.5 x 11, even if printed on A4 paper.
  • Manuscripts are reviewed anonymously. Any references that identify the author/s in the text must be masked or made anonymous (e.g., instead of citing "Field & Bloom, 2007,” cite “Author/s, 2007”). For the reference list, place the citations alphabetically as "Author/s. (2007). Details omitted for blind review." Articles can also be blinded effectively by use of the third-person. For example, rather than "in an earlier article, we showed that" substitute something like "as has been shown in Field & Bloom, 2007.” In this case, there is no need to mask the reference in the list. Finally, please do not submit a title page as part of your manuscript. We will capture that information in the submission form.
  • The journal defers to author preference in decisions about naming and capitalization of racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. Manuscripts should be internally consistent in this regard.
  • Authors should refer to The Chicago Manual of Style for general questions of style, grammar, punctuation, and form, and for footnotes of theoretical, descriptive, or essay-like material.
  • Authors should use the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association for all reference and citation formats. References must be in APA format. Manuscripts with references and/or citations in another form may be returned to the author/s.

The Harvard Educational Review (HER) is planning an upcoming Special Issue on Youth Voices in Education Research. The goal of this Special Issue is to publish essays and articles written by youth (and youth working with adults) about how their schools and communities could be more equal and just places to learn and grow. We think youth have powerful ideas about how to make our world a better place and want to ensure that teachers, education researchers, and policymakers have an opportunity to listen to and consider their ideas. In this issue, we are looking for young people who have:

  • Worked on a research project at their school or community organization and asked/answered questions about to make their school or community a better or more equitable place
  • Worked with (or are going to be working with) a researcher or teacher to study a problem in their school or community and come up with a solution
  • Written about what they wish was different about their classroom, school, or community in an essay for school or for their own learning

If any of these experiences describe something you have done, we would love to learn more about your experiences and ideas! Please consider submitting one of the following types of written pieces to us. Pieces do not need to address all the guiding questions we have inserted below, think of them as examples of what you might write about:

  • A research paper that examines a problem and/or discusses a solution about equality, learning, or justice in classrooms, schools, or community organizations [What problem did you examine and why is it important to you? What did you discover through your research? What ideas and solutions has your research uncovered that you would use to solve this problem?]
  • A reflection on your experience as part of a organization, class, or research team that describes the challenges and opportunities of working on research as a young person. [What was challenging about doing research work as a young person, or in collaboration with adults? What advice do you have for others who are interested in doing educational research with youth?]
  • An essay that shares your personal experiences as a student or member of an organization and describes a specific learning experience that was memorable, important, or inspiring for you [Tell us about the experience and how it impacted how you think about yourself, your community or the world differently. Do you think other students would benefit from having a similar learning opportunity? How would you suggest schools or organizations make that happen?]
  • An essay that describes the changes you would like to see in your local school or in schools across the country in order to ensure that all students receive a high-quality education [How should schools change to treat all students more equally? If you became principal, superintendent or US Secretary of Education, what would you change to improve education for all students? What do you think adults in your schools do not see or understand about what it is like to be a student in school today?]

All submissions must be between 500 and 5,000 words long. Submissions that are collaborations between young people and adults (teachers, nonprofit staff, researchers) are welcome, however to submit to this category, young people must be equal partners or primary authors with their adult collaborators. 

The deadline for all submissions for this Special Issue is August 31st, 2019.
 


Frequently Asked Questions

Who is considered youth?

For this issue, we consider young people aged 21 or younger to be “youth.” 

Can I send in more than one submission?

Unfortunately, due to the large volume of work that we are expecting to receive, we are asking that each potential author only send in one submission for our consideration.

Can I send in a piece that I have published elsewhere?

Unfortunately not. If you have had a piece of writing published elsewhere, we will not be able to republish it in our journal. 

How long does my submission need to be?

We are accepting submissions that range in length from 500 words to 5,000 words. Please check your piece’s word count before submitting!

Where can I go if I have more questions?

Please feel to contact us at HER.specialissues@gmail.com.

How do I submit my story?

To submit your piece, simply follow the prompts on our online submission management system (which is the page you are already on!).

How will pieces be selected for publication?

Submissions will be reviewed anonymously and selected by the Harvard Educational Review Editorial Board. 

How should my submission be formatted?

All text must be double spaced, type size must be at least 12 point with 1-inch margins on all sides, and paper size should be set to 8.5 x 11, even if printed on A4 paper. Authors  should refer to The Chicago Manual of Style for general questions of style, grammar, punctuation, and form, and for footnotes of theoretical, descriptive, or essay-like material.

Authors should use the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association for all reference and citation formats. References must be in APA format. Manuscripts with references and/or citations in another form may be returned to the author/s.

What makes a good submission?

This really depends on the type of piece you are submitting.

We find that narrative pieces or essays are typically strong when they have a clear message to convey to the reader, incorporate lots of detail and specific language, and help adults think about a topic in a new or interesting way. 

If you are submitting a research piece we would expect a bit more structure in your piece. Please include an introduction that introduces your research topic, your research methods, your key findings, and what we should take away from your research conclusions.

If you are submitting a reflection, please include at least a brief description of the research experience/project you participated in and then focus the bulk of your piece on what you’ve taken away from that experience, learned about yourself, or learned about the topic you studied. 

No matter what type of piece you submit, we expect it to be complete, fit within the word count, and be free of spelling and grammatical errors. Just like adult researchers, we recommend having someone else proofread your piece before you submit. 

Harvard Educational Review